Eco Pilgrimage for Exeter Cathedral School

 

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01 Sep 2006

 

In an effort to promote hope instead of despair for future generations, a group of children and teachers from the Exeter Cathedral School will be walking the ancient pilgrim’s way from Canterbury to London.

 
 

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In an effort to promote hope instead of despair for future generations, a group of children and teachers from the Exeter Cathedral School will be walking the 90 miles of the ancient pilgrim’s way from Canterbury to London to petition parliament about the children’s concerns for their environment. Our walk begins on Oct 20th and we’ll be petitioning Downing Street on the 26th. Our M.P. Ben Bradshaw will be meeting with us in London to discuss the children’s hops and fears for the earth.

Among other projects, we’ll be planting bio-degradable art markers which show common species now endangered on the Red List in the U.K. .We’ll also be off-setting our carbon footprint by planting trees in Devon. Our school has become an Eco-friendly one with the aid of our council.

We want to make contact with many communities. This is a grass roots project– literally. We want to involve as many children as possible in the U.K. and beyond to give them a model for children’s activism. We want children to believe they can have a voice and that their hope and idealism have a key role to play in preserving our earth.

When we arrive in London, we will present the names of thousands of children in the U.K. who are concerned about our treatment of the earth.

In addition to our M.P., we hope to involve other key figures and activists who will be joining us as we present the children’s petitions to Parliament. The Archbishop of Canterbury’s Office will be blessing our walk at both ends.

 
 

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